Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics 40th Anniversary Party

Jack Kerouac SchoolWe were proud to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at City Lights. It was fantastic night of readings from JKS faculty and guests who have taught in their summer writing program.

City Lights celebrates Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics 40th anniversary.

Hosted by Andrea Rexillus. With readings by Robert Gluck, Juliana Spahr, Cedar Sigo, Eric Baus, Michelle Naka Pierce, and Chris Pusateri.

Founded in 1974 by Allen Ginsberg and Anne Waldman, as part of Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche’s 100-year experiment, the Jack Kerouac School continues to honor its historical roots while bringing forward new questions that both invigorate and challenge the current dialogue in writing today. This event will celebrate Naropa’s 40th year and will feature readings by JKS faculty and renowned guests who have taught in the Summer Writing Program.

http://www.naropa.edu/academics/jks/

Tender Buttons: A Gertrude Stein Celebration

On Wednesday, April 23 at the San Francisco Public Library, Main Branch, editor Seth Perlow, poet and scholar Juliana Spahr, biographer Renate Stendahl and poet and author Michelle Tea discussed City Lights Publishers new edition of Tender Buttons: The Corrected Centennial Edition by Gertrude Stein.

The Modern Language Association’s Committee on Scholarly Editions just awarded Tender Buttons: The Corrected Centennial Edition its seal designating it an MLA Approved Edition. Congratulations to editor Seth Perlow!

2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the original publication of Gertrude Stein’s groundbreaking modernist classic, Tender Buttons. This centennial edition is the first and only version to incorporate Stein’s own handwritten corrections.

 

Juliana Spahr and David Buuck read from An Army of Lovers

An Army of Lovers begins with the story of two poets, Demented Panda and Koki, united in their desire to write politically engaged poetry at a time when poetry seems to have lost its ability to effect social change. Their first project is more than a failure, resulting in a spell that unleashes a torrent of raw sewage and surrealistic embodiments of consumerist excess and black site torture techniques. Subsequent chapters feature an experimental composer (Koki?) and a performance artist (Panda?) whose bodies are literally invaded with the ills of capitalism, manifested through leaking blisters and other maladies, as well as a radical remix of a Raymond Carver story, questioning “What We Talk About When We Talk About Poetry.” The novel concludes with Panda and Koki returning to the site of their failed collaboration to conjure up a more utopian vision of “an army of lovers.” Fantastical, lyrical, whimsical and wildly experimental, An Army of Lovers is as serious as it is absurd.